Apply Now Refer A Friend
What Fellows Teach
Bookmark and Share

Inside Julie's special education classroom

I chose to become a Fellow because I know the value of a good education, and I wanted a chance to effect change in the lives of what I saw as the future generation... I believe becoming a Fellow gives you a great opportunity to teach content you love and change the world one student at a time. I am inspired to teach because I feel that I am making a difference in an underrepresented population.” Nse, 2003 Fellow

 

Schools in low-income communities struggle to attract enough high-quality professionals to teach in hard-to-staff subject areas.

 

The NYC Teaching Fellows program is changing this reality and ensuring that every student, regardless of their family’s income, has a top-quality teacher.  

 

Fellows in our June 2017 cohort will train to teach only special education, math, science, English, Spanish bilingual education, and English as a New Language. 

 

The subject areas Fellows train to teach are assigned based on three factors:

  • The Fellow’s prior coursework and experience in a given subject area;
  • The Fellow’s subject area preferences, as stated in their application;
  • The needs of NYC public schools

Click on the tabs below to learn more about the subject areas Fellows teach.

 

We encourage applicants to be flexible with their subject choices and preference the highest-need subjects whenever possible. Our current highest need subjects are math, science, and bilingual.

 

  • Special Education
  • Science
  • Math
  • Spanish Bilingual Education
  • ENL
  • English
  • Special Education-Bilingual
  • Special Education-English
  • Special Education-Social Studies

Science Fellows work with middle or high school students and teach general science, biology, chemistry, physics, or earth science. Science Fellows prepare students for college and careers by teaching them the critical thinking and problem solving skills they’ll need for 21st century careers. 20 percent of all science teachers in New York City are Fellows. 

  

Science Immersion

The Teaching Fellows program offers the only Science Immersion program in the city of New York. Candidates with a depth of knowledge in the sciences – but who don’t have the requisite 30 credits required for New York State teaching certification - can participate in our two-week Immersion experience before pre-service training to begin the process of becoming certified to teach science in NYC. Last year, Science Immersion Fellows received a total stipend of $3500 for summer training. We expect a similar stipend amount for 2016 Fellows.

 

Learn more about teaching science in New York City. 

 

 

Math Fellows work with middle and high school students, covering topics from measurement to multivariate calculus. Great math teachers know that math is the foundation for a wide variety of 21st century careers including engineering, finance, technology, architecture, and computer programming, and that solid math skills throw open the door for their students to pursue the careers they choose. 24 percent of all math teachers in New York City are Fellows.

 

Math Immersion

The Teaching Fellows program offers the only Math Immersion program in the city of New York, allowing candidates with an interest in teaching math but without the state-required bachelor’s degree in mathematics to participate in an additional two weeks of training and become certified to teach math in NYC. Last year, Math Immersion Fellows received a total stipend of $3500 for summer training. We expect a similar stipend amount for 2016 Fellows. 

 

Learn more about teaching math in New York City.

 

New York is a diverse, vibrant city with students hailing from all around the world. Almost 15 percent of students in New York City speak English as their new language, and Fellows work with new immigrants and other non-native English speakers to strengthen their content knowledge while they build their social and academic English skills. Bilingual Fellows train to teach bilingual elementary education and are fluent in Spanish.

 

Spanish bilingual Fellows may teach a range of regular curriculum subjects, but do so in both Spanish and English. Some bilingual Fellows are trained to teach in bilingual special education classrooms. 

 

New York is a diverse, vibrant city with students hailing from all around the world. Almost 15 percent of students in New York City speak English as their new language, and Fellows work with new immigrants and other non-native English speakers to strengthen their content knowledge while they build their social and academic English skills. 

 

Fellows who train to teach English as a new language (ENL) work with students of all ages. Because all ENL classes are conducted in English, it is not necessary for ENL Fellows to be fluent in any other languages.

 

Special education refers to a number of services that deliver instruction to students with a range of abilities and disabilities—from mild learning disabilities to severe physical and emotional disabilities. These services are tailored to the needs of students, so special education classrooms vary greatly both within and between schools. General special education Fellows will teach a variety of subject areas.

 

Most Fellows who teach students with special needs work with students with mild learning disabilities, and often work in inclusive classroom settings consisting of both general education students and students requiring special education services teaching a range of curriculum areas. For students who require more individualized instruction, Fellows teach smaller groups of 6-15 students with special needs.

 

Fellows committed to working with students who have moderate to severe disabilities may opt to work in District 75, a specialized district focused on meeting the needs of students with disabilities. Fellows may also be assigned to teach special education with a subject area extension, allowing them to teach a specific content area at the secondary level.

 

An unjust gap exists between students with disabilities and their peers, with only 30 percent of special education students in the class of 2012 earning a high school diploma within four years. NYC Teaching Fellows are advocating for their students and leading the charge to close this gap.   

 

Learn more about teaching special education in New York City. 

 

Fellows teaching English in New York City work with middle and high school students. They leverage their content expertise to build the literacy skills of their students while showing them the promise and potential of literature.

 

Special education refers to a number of services that deliver instruction to students with a range of abilities and disabilities—from mild learning disabilities to severe physical and emotional disabilities. These services are tailored to the needs of students, so special education classrooms vary greatly both within and between schools.

 

Most Fellows who teach students with special needs work with students with mild learning disabilities, and often work in inclusive classroom settings consisting of both general education students and students requiring special education services. For students who require more individualized instruction, Fellows teach smaller groups of 6-15 students with special needs. Special education-bilingual Fellows will work with students with disabilities teaching a range of regular curriculum subjects but in both Spanish and English.

 

An unjust gap exists between students with disabilities and their peers, with only 30 percent of special education students in the class of 2012 earning a high school diploma within four years. NYC Teaching Fellows are advocating for their students and leading the charge to close this gap.

 

Learn more about teaching special education in New York City.

Special education refers to a number of services that deliver instruction to students with a range of abilities and disabilities—from mild learning disabilities to severe physical and emotional disabilities. These services are tailored to the needs of students, so special education classrooms vary greatly both within and between schools.

 

Most Fellows who teach students with special needs work with students with mild learning disabilities, and often work in inclusive classroom settings consisting of both general education students and students requiring special education services. For students who require more individualized instruction, Fellows teach smaller groups of 6-15 students with special needs. Special education-English Fellows will work with students with disabilities teaching English language arts to build the literacy skills of their students while showing them the promise and potential of literature.

 

An unjust gap exists between students with disabilities and their peers, with only 30 percent of special education students in the class of 2012 earning a high school diploma within four years. NYC Teaching Fellows are advocating for their students and leading the charge to close this gap.

 

Learn more about teaching special education in New York City.

Special education refers to a number of services that deliver instruction to students with a range of abilities and disabilities—from mild learning disabilities to severe physical and emotional disabilities. These services are tailored to the needs of students, so special education classrooms vary greatly both within and between schools.

 

Most Fellows who teach students with special needs work with students with mild learning disabilities, and often work in inclusive classroom settings consisting of both general education students and students requiring special education services. For students who require more individualized instruction, Fellows teach smaller groups of 6-15 students with special needs. Special education-social studies Fellows will work with students with disabilities teaching social studies, humanities, geography, economics, U.S and world history - helping their students connect the past with today's culture and society. An unjust gap exists between students with disabilities and their peers, with only 30 percent of special education students in the class of 2012 earning a high school diploma within four years. NYC Teaching Fellows are advocating for their students and leading the charge to close this gap. Learn more about teaching special education in New York City.


Hear from our Fellows about their experiences teaching in New York City.